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jfa is an R package for statistical audit sampling. The package provides the user with five functions for planning, performing, evaluating, and reporting an audit sample. Specifically, it contains functions for calculating sample sizes, selecting the transactions according to standard audit sampling techniques, and calculating various upper limits for the misstatement from the sample or from summary statistics. The jfa package also allows the user to create a prior probability distribution to perform Bayesian audit sampling using these functions.

For complete documentation of the package, see the package manual or visit the website.

Overview

Authors

  • Koen Derks - Initial work - Website

See also the list of contributors who participated in this project.

License

This project is licensed under the open-source GPL-3 License.

Getting started

The following instructions will get the jfa package up and running on your local machine for use in R and RStudio.

Prerequisites

  • R - The programming language used for deploying the package.

Installing

The jfa package is simple to download and set-up. The most recent version from CRAN (0.5.1) can be downloaded by running the following command in R or RStudio:

install.packages("jfa")

Alternatively, you can download the most recent (development) version from GitHub using:

devtools::install.github("koenderks/jfa")

The jfa package can then be loaded in R or RStudio by typing:

library(jfa)

Vignettes

The package vignettes show how to use the jfa package using simple examples.

Benchmarks

To validate the output, jfa’s results are currently being verified against the following benchmark(s):

Contributing

jfa is an open-source project that aims to be useful for the audit community. Your help in benchmarking and extending jfa is therefore greatly appreciated. Contributing to jfa does not have to take much time or knowledge, and there is extensive information available about it on the Wiki of this repository.

If you are willing to contribute to the improvement of the package by adding a benchmark, please check out the Wiki page on how to contribute a benchmark to jfa. If you are willing to contribute to the improvement of the package by adding a new statistical method, please check the Wiki page on how to contribute a new method to jfa.

Cheatsheet

The cheatsheet can help you get started with the jfa package and its workflow. You can download a pdf version here.

cheatsheet

Functions

Below you can find a list of the functions in the current version of jfa sorted by their occurrence in the standard audit sampling workflow.

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Create a prior distribution with the auditPrior() function:

The auditPrior() function creates a prior distribution according to one of several methods, including the audit risk model and assessments of the inherent and control risk. The returned object is of class jfaPrior and can be used with associated print() and plot() methods. jfaPrior results can also be used as input argument for the prior argument in other functions.

Full function with default arguments:

auditPrior(confidence = 0.95, likelihood = "binomial", method = "none", expectedError = 0, N = NULL, materiality = NULL, ir = 1, cr = 1, pHmin = NULL, pHplus = NULL, factor = 1, sampleN = 0, sampleK = 0)

Supported options for the likelihood argument:

likelihood Reference Description
binomial Steele (1992) Beta prior distribution (+ binomial likelihood)
poisson Stewart (2013) Gamma prior distribution (+ Poisson likelihood)
hypergeometric Dyer and Pierce (1991) Beta-binomial prior distribution (+ hypergeometric likelihood)

Supported options for the method argument:

method Reference Description Additional arguments
none Derks et al. (2020) No prior information
arm Derks et al. (2020) Inherent risk and internal control risk (ARM) ir and cr
median Derks et al. (2020) Equal prior probabilities for hypotheses
hypotheses Derks et al. (2020) Custom prior probabilities for hypotheses pHmin or pHplus
sample Derks et al. (2020) Earlier sample sampleN and sampleK
factor Derks et al. (2020) Weighted earlier sample factor, sampleN and sampleK

Plan a sample with the planning() function:

The planning() function calculates the required sample size for a statistical audit sample, based on the Poisson, binomial, or hypergeometric likelihood. A prior can be specified to combine with the specified likelihood in order to perform Bayesian planning. The returned jfaPlanning object has a print() and a plot() method. In the planning() function, the prior argument can be an object of class jfaPrior as returned by the auditPrior() function.

Full function with default arguments:

planning(confidence = 0.95, expectedError = 0, likelihood = "poisson", N = NULL, materiality = NULL, minPrecision = NULL, prior = FALSE, kPrior = 0, nPrior = 0, increase = 1, maxSize = 5000)

Supported options for the likelihood argument:

likelihood Reference Description
binomial Stewart (2012) Binomial likelihood
poisson Stewart (2012) Poisson likelihood
hypergeometric Stewart (2012) Hypergeometric likelihood

Select transactions with the selection() function:

The selection() function takes a data frame and performs sampling according to one of three algorithms: random sampling, cell sampling, or fixed interval sampling in combination with either record sampling or monetary unit sampling. The returned jfaSelection object has a print() and a plot() method. In the selection() function, the sampleSize argument can be an object of class jfaPlanning as returned by the planning() function.

Full function with default arguments:

selection(population, sampleSize, units = "records", algorithm = "random", bookValues = NULL, intervalStartingPoint = 1, ordered = TRUE, ascending = TRUE, withReplacement = FALSE, seed = 1)

Supported options for the units argument:

units Reference Description Additional arguments
records Leslie, Teitlebaum, and Anderson (1979) Sampling units are transactions
mus Leslie, Teitlebaum, and Anderson (1979) Sampling units are monetary units bookValues

Supported options for the algorithm argument:

algorithm Reference Description Additional arguments
random Random sampling
cell Cell sampling
interval Systematic sampling / Fixed interval sampling intervalStartingPoint

Evaluate a sample with the evaluation() function:

The evaluation() function takes a sample data frame or summary statistics about an evaluated audit sample and calculates a confidence bound according to a specified method. The returned jfaEvalution object has a print() and plot() method. In the evaluation() function, the prior argument can be an object of class jfaPrior as returned by the auditPrior() function.

Full function with default arguments:

evaluation(confidence = 0.95, method = "binomial", N = NULL, sample = NULL, bookValues = NULL, auditValues = NULL, counts = NULL, nSumstats = NULL, kSumstats = NULL, materiality = NULL, minPrecision = NULL, prior = FALSE, nPrior = 0, kPrior = 0, rohrbachDelta = 2.7, momentPoptype = "accounts", populationBookValue = NULL, csA = 1, csB = 3, csMu = 0.5)

Supported options for the method argument:

method Reference Description Additional arguments
binomial Stewart (2012) Binomial likelihood
poisson Stewart (2012) Poisson likelihood
hypergeometric Stewart (2012) Hypergeometric likelihood
stringer Bickel (1992) Classical Stringer bound
stringer-meikle Meikle (1972) Stringer bound with Meikle’s correction
stringer-lta Leslie, Teitlebaum, & Anderson (1979) Stringer bound with LTA correction
stringer-pvz Pap and van Zuijlen (1996) Modified Stringer bound
rohrbach Rohrbach (1993) Rohrbach’s augmented variance estimator rohrbachDelta
moment Dworin and Grimlund (1984) Modified moment bound momentPoptype
coxsnell Cox and Snell (1979) Cox and Snell bound csA, csB, and csMu
direct Touw and Hoogduin (2011) Direct estimator populationBookValue
difference Touw and Hoogduin (2011) Difference estimator populationBookValue
quotient Touw and Hoogduin (2011) Quotient estimator populationBookValue
regression Touw and Hoogduin (2011) Regression estimator populationBookValue

Generate a report with the report() function:

The report() function takes an object of class jfaEvaluation as returned by the evaluation() function, automatically generates a html or pdf report containing the analysis results and their interpretation, and saves the report to your local computer.

Full function with default arguments:

report(object = NULL, file = NULL, format = "html_document")

For an example report, see the following link.

References

  • Bickel, P. J. (1992). Inference and auditing: The Stringer bound. International Statistical Review, 60(2), 197–209. - View online
  • Cox, D. R., & Snell, E. J. (1979). On sampling and the estimation of rare errors. Biometrika, 66(1), 125-132. - View online
  • Derks, K. (2020). jfa: Bayesian and classical audit sampling. R package version 0.5.0. - View online
  • Derks, K., de Swart, J., van Batenburg, P., Wagenmakers, E.-J., & Wetzels, R. (2020). Priors in a Bayesian audit: How integration of existing information into the prior distribution can improve audit transparency and efficiency. Under review. - View online
  • Dworin, L. D. and Grimlund, R. A. (1984). Dollar-unit sampling for accounts receivable and inventory. The Accounting Review, 59(2), 218–241. - View online
  • Dyer, D., & Pierce, R. L. (1993). On the choice of the prior distribution in hypergeometric sampling. Communications in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 22(8), 2125-2146. - View online
  • Meikle, G. R. (1972). Statistical Sampling in an Audit Context. Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants.
  • Leslie, D. A., Teitlebaum, A. D., & Anderson, R. J. (1979). Dollar-unit sampling: A practical guide for auditors. London: Pitman.
  • Pap, G., & van Zuijlen, M. C. (1996). On the asymptotic behaviour of the Stringer bound. Statistica Neerlandica, 50(3), 367-389. - View online
  • Rohrbach, K. J. (1993). Variance augmentation to achieve nominal coverage probability in sampling from audit populations. Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory, 12(2), 79-97.
  • Steele, A. (1992). Audit risk and audit evidence: The Bayesian approach to statistical auditing. San Diego: Academic Press.
  • Stewart, T. R. (2012). Technical notes on the AICPA audit guide audit sampling. American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, New York. - View online
  • Stewart, T. R. (2013). A Bayesian audit assurance model with application to the component materiality problem in group audits. VU University, Amsterdam. - View online
  • Touw, P., and Hoogduin, L. (2011). Statistiek voor audit en controlling. Boom uitgevers, Amsterdam.

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